Unique insights by French archaeologists into UAE’s hidden treasures put on display

The exhibition showcases weapons and artefacts from the Neolithic to the Islamic periods until the 17th century.

Valuable treasures. Artefacts on display at the Sharjah Archaeology Museum. (Sharjah Archaeology Museum)


2017/11/05 Issue: 130 Page: 22


The Arab Weekly
N.P. Krishna Kumar



Sharjah - The world’s oldest natural pearl, called the “Emir­ates’ pearl,” is, for the first time, being shown to the public at the Shar­jah Archaeology Museum in a spe­cial exhibition celebrating a four-decade partnership with French archaeologists to unearth the hidden secrets of the United Arab Emirates’ past.

The exhibition, titled “40 Years of Archaeological Cooperation between the United Arab Emir­ates and France” is to run through January 31, 2018. It is supported by UNESCO and co-organised with L’institut Français in the UAE, the cultural department of the French Embassy.

The “Emirates’ pearl” is one of 100 unique objects excavated by the French Archaeological Mission to the UAE since it began work in 1977. Teams led by the French Ar­chaeological Mission have worked in Sharjah, Abu Dhabi, Fujairah, Ras Al Khaimah and Umm al-Qu­wain on the most significant exca­vations carried out in the country.

The exhibition is guest-curated by Sophie Méry, an archaeologist and ceramologist specialising in the early history of Arabia who led the French Archaeological Mission in Abu Dhabi from 1995-99 and has since headed the mission in the country.

“We present here today a num­ber of objects from all the main 11 sites we excavated, and they are from the Neolithic to the Islamic period until the 17th century AD,” Méry said. “We have made a se­lection of the objects we found including ornaments, weapons, jewellery, vessels in pottery or soft stone, incense burners, etc…”

“Through our excavations, we are able to show that there is a con­tinuum in history which (starts) in the Neolithic times, even before the cultural identity, which is the central identity of the Emirates. It goes to 7,500 years ago.”

Méry explained that the style of the jewellery and the weapons “are very special, rather unique,” while sharing technologies and some styles from neighbouring countries.

“The technology of the fish hooks — made of mother of pearl and shell fish and oyster shells — is common in the UAE and Oman. As far as we know today, these are not found in Saudi Arabia, Qatar or Ku­wait,” she said.

“We were also glad to find in Umm al-Quwain the most ancient pearls, which means the most an­cient vestige of pearling in that emirate, and it dates back 7,500 years ago.”

French Ambassador to the UAE Ludovic Pouille hailed the “very symbolic” event, which he said not only “marks 40 years of coop­eration in the field of archaeology but celebrates more than 40 years of friendship between the UAE and France.”

“We are so proud to have been able to work with Emirati archaeol­ogists to help them in discovering and revealing to the public the his­tory of this country. This country is young — only 46 years old — but its history goes very deep. This exhi­bition is a very good opportunity to discover that the UAE was already a hub between the Mediterranean and the Indus civilisations 7,000 years ago,” Pouille said.

“We have pieces from five emir­ates and from across 11 sites where the French archaeologists have worked for the last 40 years and will continue to do so for the next 40 years to help discover the his­tory of this country with their Emi­rati friends and counterparts,” the ambassador added.

Excavations started in 1977 at Jebel Hafeet, Hili and Rumeilah in the eastern region of Abu Dhabi emirate. In 1985, the French ar­chaeologists’ work extended to sites in Sharjah, Umm al-Quwain and Ras Al Khaimah and, in 1999, to Fujairah.

French archaeology teams have returned every year, making criti­cal discoveries of numerous valu­able artefacts, including flint ar­rowheads, mother-of-pearl fish hooks, painted pottery and jew­ellery made from shells that date from the Neolithic period.

Bronze Age objects at the exhi­bition include pottery created lo­cally and elsewhere in the region, revealing the UAE’s importance as a centre of trade. Iron Age objects include a range of weapons, such as copper arrowheads and a bronze dagger. Advancements in pottery are revealed by intricate incense burners and figurines.

Highlights from the Late Pre- Islamic Period include silver coins, a bronze bull head and a bronze plaque inscribed in Aramaic. More recent Islamic Age discoveries fea­ture a huge range of pottery and ceramic objects made locally and taken to the UAE from Iran, China and Thailand.

Manal Ataya, director-general of Sharjah Museums Authority, said: “The excavations have revealed many treasures that provide us with significant knowledge of the past socio-economic habits of the people living here from the Neo­lithic to Islamic periods.

“For visitors, these discoveries present an incredible opportunity to learn about UAE history and heritage and to understand the important role of archaeologists in discovering artefacts and sites that enrich our country’s identity.”


N.P. Krishna Kumar is an Arab Weekly correspondent in Dubai.


As Printed
MENA Now
Editors' Picks

The Arab Weekly Newspaper reaches Western & Arabic audience that are influential as well as being affluent.

From Europe to the Middle East,and North America, The Arab Weekly talks to opinion formers and influential figures, providing insight and comment on national, international and regional news through the focus of Arabic countries and community.

Published by Al Arab Publishing House

Publisher and Group Executive Editor: Haitham El-Zobaidi, PhD

Editor-in-Chief: Oussama Romdhani

Managing Editor: Iman Zayat

Deputy Managing Editor and Online Editor: Mamoon Alabbasi

Senior Editor: John Hendel

Chief Copy Editor: Richard Pretorius

Copy Editor: Stephen Quillen

Analysis Section Editor: Ed Blanche

East/West Section Editor: Mark Habeeb

Gulf Section Editor: Mohammed Alkhereiji

Society and Travel Sections Editor: Samar Kadi

Syria and Lebanon Sections Editor: Simon Speakman Cordall

Contributing Editor: Rashmee Roshan Lall

Senior Correspondents: Mahmud el-Shafey (London) & Lamine Ghanmi (Tunis)

Regular Columnists

Claude Salhani

Yavuz Baydar

Correspondents

Saad Guerraoui (Casablanca)

Dunia El-Zobaidi (London)

Roua Khlifi (Tunis)

Thomas Seibert (Washington)

Chief Designer: Marwen Hmedi

Designers

Ibrahim Ben Bechir

Hanen Jebali

Published by Al Arab Publishing House

Contact editor at:editor@thearabweekly.com

Subscription & Advertising: Ads@alarab.co.uk

Tel 020 3667 7249

Mohamed Al Mufti

Marketing & Advertising Manager

Tel (Main) +44 20 6702 3999

Direct: +44 20 8742 9262

www.alarab.co.uk

Al Arab Publishing House

Kensington Centre

177-179 Hammersmith Road

London W6 8BS , UK

Tel: (+44) 20 7602 3999

Fax: (+44) 20 7602 8778

Follow Us
© The Arab Weekly, All rights reserved